Meaningful or playful?

I chose a scene from the movie Invasion of the Body Snatchers to add to the scene from the Night Call episode. Both of these clips are in the sci-fi genre. They are also from about the same time period. They are also both black-and-white. I would say that these videos are just playful examples of the genre of sci-fi. Twilight Zone definitely is known for having meaningful messages though. I think YouTube is probably the most current up- to -date information bank that we have. It is so well-known across the world and the videos on there are so diverse, that I would consider YouTube to really just be video as we know it on the web.

Sci-fi Genres: Night Call and Invasion of the Body Snatchers

I researched some of the production notes on the episode Night Call of the Twilight Zone on the website IMDb.com. It was supposed to air on November 22, 1963, but was postponed because of the assassination of JFK. Instead, the episode aired on February 7th, 1964. The episode’s script was adapted from the short story “Long Distance Call” by Richard Matheson. The director was Jacques Tourneur for this episode. The stars of this episode were Gladys Cooper, Nora Marlowe, Martine Bartlett, and of course Rod Serling. The genre of the Twilight Zone show would be sci-fi. I choose a scene from another sci-fi genre, the movie, “Invasion of the Body-Snatchers.”

In the scene from the body snatchers, you really need the audio to know what is going on because they aren’t really doing anything except talking in this scene. They do a lot of cut scenes going back and forth to each character that is talking. The camera focuses dead center on the speaker. The speaker is in the center of the screen giving symmetry to the shot. The speakers for the most part are at eye-level. There is some sad music playing in the background conveying a sad atmosphere.

Final Review of Night Call

Review 1:I chose a scene from the episode “Night Call” to review. It is the first scene of the episode. When the scene starts the camera pans from the left side of the room to the right past a rocking chair and then focuses on the woman in the bed. The camera angle is above the woman therefore focusing the scene around her. You can tell it is storming outside because of the flashes of light. They did a good job of portraying what was going on in the scene even though there was no sound. You knew what was going on in the scene because the camera portrayed the sequence of events. The way that the camera focused on the telephone and then back to the woman, where she expresses disdain, you can tell that the phone was ringing. The camera only seemed to switch views 2 or 3 times, from the woman to the telephone. When the camera switched to the telephone it was directly facing the telephone, at a front facing angle. The quick cut to the telephone and then back to the woman indicates that there is some action taking place. At the end of this scene, the camera pans back from right to left, clearly ending the scene.

Review 2: Lightning crashes, indicating a bad thunderstorm. The phone rings twice. Someone picks up the phone and says hello. Thunder crashes in the background. There is no one on the line. Static. Woman hangs up. Thunder crashes again. Immediately, the phone rings again. You can hear her pick up. She says hello? hello? No one there. She hangs up. Background music begins. It sounds ominous.

The sound of thunder introduces the scene as the first audio you hear. It sets the theme for the entire scene. The timing of the thunder and the phone seems to be related. The actress waits for the person on the line to respond before she repeats hello?. There are definite pauses in the scene, maybe to add more dramatic effect and mystery to the scene. The woman seems nervous in the tone of her voice as well as the pauses she makes when she’s waiting for someone to answer her. You can also faintly hear static from the phone. This adds to the mysterious vibe of the scene.

Review 3: It seems like anytime that the actress was talking, that the thunder was quiet. Once the thunder started again, the phone immediately rang. When the woman seemed more worried, it seemed like the camera zoomed closer or more intimately on her face and facial reactions. I’m assuming by getting a closer shot of the actress that this was to provoke more sympathy out of the viewer.

Final Conclusion:
In the opening of the scene, the camera panned to the right. From Roger Ebert’s article “How to read a movie”, we know that “right is more positive”. He also mentions that “the future seems to live on the right, the past on the left.” The idea of this is that the action (what is taking place in the scene) is going to happen towards the right. Ebert also mentions that “symmetrical compositions seem at rest”. The position of the camera on the first few shots of the woman seem very symmetrical creating balance and focus on the subject. The first few shots of the woman are also above her making her seem vulnerable. Ebert refers to this as making “characters into pawns”.

 

 

Review 3: Put it all together

It seems like anytime that the actress was talking, that the thunder was quiet. Once the thunder started again, the phone immediately rang. When the woman seemed more worried, it seemed like the camera zoomed closer or more intimately on her face and facial reactions. I’m assuming by getting a closer shot of the actress that this was to provoke more sympathy out of the viewer.

Review 2: Analyze the Audio track

Lightning crashes, indicating a bad thunderstorm. The phone rings twice. Someone picks up the phone and says hello. Thunder crashes in the background. There is no one on the line. Static. Woman hangs up. Thunder crashes again. Immediately, the phone rings again. You can hear her pick up. She says hello? hello? No one there. She hangs up. Background music begins. It sounds ominous.

The sound of thunder introduces the scene as the first audio you hear. It  sets the  theme for the entire scene. The timing of the thunder and the phone seems to be related. The actress waits for the person on the line to respond before she repeats hello?. There are definite pauses in the scene, maybe to add more dramatic effect and mystery to the scene. The woman seems nervous in the tone of her voice as well as the pauses she makes when she’s waiting for someone to answer her. You can also faintly hear static from the phone. This adds to the mysterious vibe of the scene.

Review 1: Analyze the camera work

I chose a scene from the episode “Night Call” to review. It is the first scene of the episode.  When the scene starts the camera pans from the left side of the room to the right past a rocking chair and then focuses on the woman in the bed. The camera angle is above the woman therefore focusing the scene around her. You can tell it is storming outside because of the flashes of light. They did a good job of portraying what was going on in the scene even though there was no sound. You knew what was going on in the scene because the camera portrayed the sequence of events. The way that the camera focused on the telephone and then back to the woman, where she expresses disdain, you can tell that the phone was ringing.  The camera only seemed to switch views 2 or 3 times, from the woman to the telephone. When the camera switched to the telephone it was directly facing the telephone, at a front facing angle. The quick cut to the telephone and then back to the woman indicates that there is some action taking place. At the end of this scene, the camera pans back from right to left, clearly ending the scene.

AnimatedGIF Assignments: Turn A GIF Into A FIG- 4 stars

Recently, I was exposed to reverse-animated GIFs. I must say, some are hilarious. Find a video clip, or shoot one of yourself, and then make it playback in reverse over and over again as a GIF. Try to find a situation that is absolutely mind-blowing when played backwards.
Link to assignment: http://assignments.ds106.us/assignments/turn-a-gif-into-a-fig/

This is a funny video of a cat I reversed. Enjoy!

 

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Design Safari/ Design Elements

Metaphors/Symbol- I took this picture when I was walking by the river.  This picture is of a family of turtles represents the symbol of “family” and “kinship”. The turtles are very close together in the center of the frame and showcase the unity of their group.

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Balance- I took this picture as I was walking to class the other day. It is a picture of a flower that was sitting perfectly on a bench, I didn’t even put it there. It could reflect the design element of balance, as the flower is almost symmetrical in the center of the picture.

 

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Proportion- This card was also found on campus. I did not place it here, it was just sitting there when I walked by, so I thought it would make a good picture. I believe it could represent the design element of proportion. Because I took the picture closer up with the main focus being on the card, the proportions of the objects fit well in the frame. There is enough focus on the card, but it is not overwhelming and also shows the beauty of the backdrop.

 

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Color- The emphasis of color in this photograph is obvious, drawing the eye immediately to the lettering.

 

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Creative Commons

CC stands for Creative Commons. Creative Commons is an organization that functions as a non-profit and allows the sharing of copyrighted materials. A creative commons license allows the author of a work to give permission to others to share use or change the original work. This license also protects the people who share or change the work from copyright infringement, as long as they follow the conditions described by the author.  Copyright infringement is when you use or reproduce a work that is copyrighted without the author’s permission.  Intellectual Property laws protect the rights of the author or creator of original works.

Copy right infringement could happen in this class if a student uses material that is copyrighted. I plan on siting all works and authors as well as where I found them correctly in this course. I will not use any works for commercial use. I also plan on sharing my work openly, so that others can use or build on my work as they please.

I used the website creativecommons.org, as well as  the article “How to Correctly Use Creative Commons Works” by Jonathan Bailey from the website Plagiarism Today (http://www.plagiarismtoday.com/2010/01/12/how-to-correctly-use-creative-commons-works/) for research. Creativecommons.org was especially helpful.

Animated GIF Assignments: StereoGIFs- 1 star

Back in the 1800s, stereograms were a popular way of creating the optical illusion of depth in a static image by placing two very similar images side by side. they could be viewed using a stereoscope to create the illusion. The New York Public library has an extensive collection of stereograms, and recently created the Stereogranimator tool (http://stereo.nypl.org/) to allow people to turn these into animated GIFs, which are just as effective in creating a sense of depth. Use the Stereogranimator to create an animated GIF that makes the image appear to be 3D, or try manipulating the frames to create another interesting effect (e.g. http://stereo.nypl.org/view/41623)
 

This is a cat Gif….

 

GIF made with the NYPL Labs Stereogranimator - view more at http://stereo.nypl.org/gallery/index
GIF made with the NYPL Labs Stereogranimator